Dance


Reviewed by Julian Wilson

Farchild/Chivalry Has Died

“Do you smile when I look up/Or does your hand promptly move down to the back of my pants?” sings Farchild on “Ey, Papi,” a brutally frank demand for r-e-s-p-e-c-t directed towards male horndogs. Even though she doesn’t slam the floor with big, metallic guitars, with “Ey, Papi” there’s no doubt that Farchild is from Seattle, especially when she warns, “Make sure that hand stays firmly around my waist/Cause if it slips without permission you might find yourself/Losing a tooth.” Quite edgy and tough, but Seattle rock has never been known for its softness, right?

However, Farchild isn’t “rock.” Although “Timmy’s a Rebel” and “Orbital” have their share of prime, speaker-filling Seattle riffola, Farchild’s music most often powered by keyboards. If Tori Amos, instead of just dating Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails at one point, had actually fronted for his group, the result might’ve been like this album. The slow piano track “Natural Solitude” certainly has that Amos-like dimly-lit introspection but the pounding percussion and machine clanging of “Peter Piper” is pure NIN. At only eight cuts, I wish that Chivalry Has Died were longer, but in these days of filler-filled CDs that’s a huge compliment.

http://www.farchildmusic.com

Advertisements
Paris-born French-Italian Lea Jones may epitomize the traditional and exotic European beauty, but her musical heart is rooted in America. Her songs recapture what has been missing from U.S. pop music since the ’80s, the soulful depth that added a timeless quality to even the most innocuous lyrics. 
Julian Wilson: You have the features of a model. Do you do modeling work as well?
 
Lea Jones: I thought about it, but singing means so much more to me that I did not choose to.
 
Wilson: The song, “Lucky Boy,” embraces hip-hop, R&B, and even Adult Contemporary. Have you always been this eclectic in your musical styles?
 
Jones: Music is universal, even if I always have been influenced by soul, R&B, groovy sounds. This is who I am. French-Italian, living in the U.S. for so long, travelling, learning and trying to understand different cultures and styles. Studying piano, accordion, blues, opera singing, and now working with Ron Anderson, the most amazing voice teacher I have ever met.
 
Wilson: How much creative input do you have in your songs?
 
Jones: It depends on the songs. For the most part, I collaborated with Donna Wintergreen who knew how to put words on my ideas, melodies or words I had written. For “Lucky Boy,” Jean-Michel Soupraya (producer, composer, arranger) found the hook, then Frank Gelibert, his associate, came to help and arrange the song. In two days, it was done. This is real teamwork. And I would like to also thank Eddie Adams, who always believed in me. How much input I have does not really matter to me; it all becomes real thanks to an incredible team who worked together.
 
Wilson: How long have been in the music industry?
 
Jones: I have been singing, writing, and composing for as long as I can remember.
 
Wilson: Where were your born and what kind of music did you grow up on?
 
Jones: I was born in Paris, in Montmartre, next to the Moulin Rouge. It is a very creative and artistic area of Paris. I grew up listening to Edith Piaf, Stevie Wonder, the Beatles, the Rolling Stones – any kind of music I could find, but mostly American.
 
Wilson: What can people expect from your full-length CD?

Jones: Surprise! A soulful adventure. It will probably talk a lot about life’s ups and downs, emotions. A very professional production and great lyrics, sounds, melodies, and even songs with an orchestra.

http://www.jmwestentertainment.com

 

Reviewed by Julian Wilson

iCande/SOPO

If the album cover looks like something out of the late ’80s-early ’90s R&B and hip-hop scene, it’s probably no coincidence. After all, one of the tracks here is called “Boy Toy,” a term that Madonna popularized during the ’80s. Given that everything old is new again, iCande are on target in appealing to both teenagers (their energetic, slickly-produced girl pop and drop-dead gorgeous looks have mass appeal to adolescents of both sexes) and their parents (who’ll be able to hear the influences of old-school rap and and electro-pop in their music).

Coincidence or not, the hip-hop initial cut “The Opener” reminded me so much of the KLF that I stopped to check my watch to see if it was 3 a.m. again. Synthesizers play a heavy role in iCande’s songs, and they’re used here in a more retro fashion than their contemporaries. “Jealous” and “Blah Blah Girl” are blooming with bouncy, charming keyboard rhythms, closer to Bananarama than any of today’s R&B superstars. 

http://icandemusic.com